Healthcare for All

Every American should have high-quality healthcare, be able to see a doctor, and be able to afford prescriptions--no matter if they’re rich or poor, young or old, or have pre-existing conditions or not. We should not only improve the existing model--we have to move to a Medicare-for-all style system.

In the short-term, we have to shore up the ACA by reinstating the individual mandate and the subsidies. Introducing a public option - like Senator Merkley and Murphy's Choose Medicare Act - would introduce a new Medicare plan on every single state and federal exchange, available to employers and individuals. Longer term, our nation should move to a Medicare-for-all model of healthcare coverage.

This could solve a host of issues for our country, including getting our uninsured folks healthcare and getting our veterans who do not live near a VA access to coverage.

And it frees up employers from having to negotiate with insurance companies year after year and having the administrative, internal expenses of offering healthcare to employees.

I was a 17-year old runaway who depended on Medicaid for prenatal care. I can speak to this issue first-hand.

I’m also a healthcare finance expert with 15 years experience, and I was appointed by the City Council to serve on the board of Central Health whose mission is delivering healthcare to low-income folks and under-served communities. Our state and our country are facing a healthcare crisis among women due to under-funding of Medicaid. And this affects minority and African American women at alarmingly disproportionate rates. That’s a moral outrage, and I know we can fix that.

Black women are more likely to die as a result of pregnancy, because too many women lack prenatal care early, and because they are more likely to have the pre-existing conditions that put them at high risk. Too many Texas women — particularly low-income women — don’t have access to health insurance, birth control, mental health care, substance abuse treatment and other services that could help them become healthier before and after pregnancy.

Texas’ third-world maternal mortality crisis is tragic, alarming, and totally preventable.

We need a continuum of care that doesn't end 60 days after childbirth. We need a continuum of care that educates women about breast cancer prevention and hypetension risks with subsequent preganacies and pelvic floor disorders--we can turn the tide but we have to embrace real “pro-life” (and I mean policies that are “pro-mother” that do not devalue the life of the mother).

These Medicare and Medicaid cuts are preventable at the federal level. Not only will my budget priorities favor those who need our help, but statistically speaking, we know that when we elect women, we pass more laws that specifically benefit women’s health.

That’s a big part of the reason I favor a Medicare-for-All type system. We can address these issues and improve outcomes if we build on the strong foundation President Obama’s administration laid, which expanded access to high-quality health care. The Trump administration is waging an all-out war on women’s health, which disproportionately and unjustly affects African American women. That has to end, and that’s part of the reason I’m running for Congress, so that we can remove the barriers to women’s health decision-making.

When I was appointed to the board at Central Health, the first thing I did was get a traditionally under-served, minority community in Del Valle a full-time clinic. They’d been asking for years, but the board had never delivered; as soon as I got onto the board, I delivered. If I’m elected, I’m going to fight just as hard for women, black and Latinx communities, and the under-served in Congress.

My commitments include:


• Stabilizing the ACA, and moving toward a system where American has high quality, affordable healthcare

• Fully funding Medicare and Medicaid

• Expanding healthcare for Texans in rural parts of the state, who often have difficulty finding quality, affordable health care

• Defending access to reproductive health care

• Increasing funding for community health centers, and supporting the healthcare workforce

• Requiring every hospital where babies are delivered to have "hemorrhage toolkits" and "hemorrhage carts", specifically for this preventable cause of death, which is one of the leading causes of maternal mortality

• Ensuring that every woman in America has the best possible education about pelvic floor disorders, breast cancer, hypertension; good prenatal care; and that they are getting screening for pre-existing conditions care for chronic conditions